Roses, Legumes, Brassicas, and More…

All of the wildflowers on this page are members of the Rosids order.

See also our Rosids Tree Gallery.

Rose Family

Silverweed

Silverweed
Cattle Pond

Potentilla anserina.

The plant produces yellow flowers that resemble small buttercups. The flowers have five petals and bloom in late spring to early summer. 

Creeping Cinquefoil

Creeping Cinquefoil
Cattle Pond

Potentilla reptans.

Creeping cinquefoil is a low-growing, creeping perennial plant with bright yellow flowers.

Flowers: 7-11mm

Wild Strawberry

Wild Strawberry
Lime Tree Avenue

Fragaria vesca.

Wild strawberry is a small perennial plant that grows in various habitats, including meadows, woodlands, and even rocky areas. It forms low, spreading mats of green foliage and produces small, flavorful strawberries that are bursting with sweetness. 

Tormentil

Tormentil
Derby Road

Potentilla erecta.

Tormentil is a low-growing, creeping perennial plant with yellow flowers that bloom from May to September. It is found in acid grassland, heathland, and moorland.

Bramble

Bramble
In most wooded areas

Rubus fruticosus.

The bramble is a prickly shrub that can grow up to two meters tall. It has long, arching stems with thorns, and its leaves are divided into three or five serrated leaflets. The bramble produces berries in summer.

Yellow Averns

Yellow Averns
Behind the lake

Geum aleppicum.

Yellow Averns grow to about 1m tall with pinnate leaves. The flowers are 2 cm in diameter, yellow, with five to seven toothed petals.

Willowherb

Willowherb
Commonplace

Epilobium.

Willowherb is a family of tall, thin plants with narrow leaves and pink or purple flowers.

Perforate St John’s-wort

St John's Wort
Reed bed

Hypericum perforatum.

One of many varieties of St John’s-wort, most likely perforatum due to the small black dots seen on the leaves, and some petals.

Flowers Jun to September.

Trailing St John’s-wort

Trailing St John's Wort
Reed bed

Hypericum humifusum.

Similar to the Perforate St John’s-wort, but rather than tall flower stems, it is trailing in nature. Also has the distinctive black dots. Flowers Jun to September.

Legume Family

Gorse

Gorse
Ha-Ha by Lake

Ulex europaeus.

Gorse is an important habitat for wildlife, providing shelter for birds, small mammals, and invertebrates, but can be a problematic invasive species.

White Clover

White Clover
White Clover

Trifolium repens.

White or pink flowers are shaped like ball leaves divided into three leaflets.

Bird’s-foot-trefoil

Bird's-foot Trefoil
Between Cow Pond and the Ha-Ha, and Front of Hall

Lotus.

Bird’s-foot-trefoil is a perennial legume. The flowers are bright yellow and bloom in the spring and summer. The seed pods are brown to purple and resemble a bird’s foot.

Brassica Family

Garlic Mustard

Garlic Mustard
Behind the lake

Alliaria petiolata.

Garlic Mustard is an invasive herbaceous plant native to Europe. It has heart-shaped leaves with a garlicky aroma when crushed. Garlic Mustard produces small clusters of white flowers and spreads rapidly, outcompeting native plants. It poses a threat to biodiversity in woodland areas and is challenging to control.

Hedge Mustard

Hedge Mustard
Digby

Sisymbrium officinale.

Hedge mustard is a biennial or perennial herbaceous plant. It has deeply lobed leaves and produces small clusters of yellow flowers. Hedge mustard is commonly found in hedgerows, roadsides, and disturbed areas. It has a long history of culinary and medicinal uses.

Treacle-mustard

Treacle Mustard
Pilkintons, by car park

Erysimum cheiranthoides.

Treacle-mustard is an annual or biennial herbaceous plant. It is characterised by yellow flowers and narrow, lance-shaped leaves. Treacle mustard is typically found in fields, disturbed areas, and along roadsides. It is considered a weed in some regions but has medicinal uses in traditional herbal medicine.

Shepherd’s-purse

Shepherd's-purse
Pilkintons Field

Capsella bursa-pastoris.

Shepherd’s purse is a small annual or biennial herbaceous plant that has basal rosettes of deeply lobed leaves that resemble a shepherd’s purse, hence its common name.  Shepherd’s purse produces small, white flowers that have four petals arranged in a cross shape.

Common Whitlowgrass

Common Whitlowgrass
Main show field

Erophila verna.

Flowers in spring.  Each stem has about 10 long-stalked flowers with 4 white petals, which are deeply divided so that it can appear that there are 8 petals.

Cuckooflower

Cuckooflower
Pilkintons Field

Cardamine pratensis.

Lady’s Smock, or cuckooflower, is a herbaceous perennial plant. The plant produces delicate, four-petaled flowers that are usually pink or pale lilac in colour, occasionally white.

Hairy Bitter-cress

Hairy Bitter-cress
Stable block

Cardamine hirsuta.

Found on damp disturbed ground. Flowers from February to November.

More…

Herb Robert

Herb Robert
Lime Tree Avenue

Geranium robertianum.

Geranium Family

Herb Robert is a small plant with divided leaves and pink or purple flowers. It grows in woodlands and meadows, preferring shady areas. It blooms in spring and early summer, attracting bees and butterflies. Herb Robert has a strong scent.

Common Mallow

Wildflower - Common Mallow
In the Dam by the Lake

Malva sylvestris.

Mallow Family.

Common mallow (Malva sylvestris) is a herbaceous plant that grows up to 1.5 meters tall. It has hairy stems and leaves, and its flowers are pink or purple with darker stripes. 

Petty Spurge

Petty Spurge
Lake Dam

Euphorbia peplus.

Spurge Family

Flower: Greenish.

Leaves: Oval.

Upright annual, found in many places.

Water-cress

Watercress
Cattle Pond

Rorippa nasturtium-aquaticum.

Cabbage Family.

Water-cress flowers are small, white, and four-petaled. They are borne in clusters on stalks that rise above the leaves. The flowers have a peppery, mustardy scent and are attractive to bees and other pollinators.

Enchanter’s-nightshade 

Enchanter's Nightshade
Derby Road

Circaea lutetiana.

Willowherb Family.

Enchanter’s-nightshade is a herbaceous perennial plant that grows in sun-dappled woodland.  It has slender stems with opposite leaves and small, pinkish-white flowers with two strongly notched petals. Its fruit is an oval, one-seeded dry fruit covered in bristles with little hooks, which help it to disperse by attaching itself to passing animals and birds. 

Photographs used on these Wildflower pages were taken in Wollaton Park and are reproduced with the original artist’s permission. 

Credits:  Colin Robbins, Gila Taylor, Chris Golightly, Kiyoko Naish, Unni Williams, Kyle Heesom, Wendy Martin.

Copyright © for each picture remains with the original artist, who is duly acknowledged and credited for each image.